July 28, 2014

Cora's Transformation - Part 2

If you haven't read Part 1 - Go Here First!

We had a situation erupt – 3 days after Cora gave birth to Seamus.  Naturally – it was a Friday night.  Not a good time to have this huge necessity become a reality - getting Cora into the chute.  The last time we tried getting her into the chute – Dwayne had backed it up to the gate for the little yard.  He refused to square it up – and left a gap.  Cora jumped through - and jumped me.  Knocked me on my butt.  Scared the crap out of Dr. Kate.  I got up looking for the cow.

That was a bad day.  Dwayne had to repair fencing and run a LOT MORE hotwire.  Cora didn’t get her annuals that day.  Brucey had jumped through the gap before Cora.  He jumped over the 3 foot fence for the chicken yard.  And then he got too scared to jump back over – after we got a halter and lead rope on him.  Dwayne had to rip up part of the fence so I could get him out.  And then that fart walked with me - all the way across the open area – into Artist’s paddock – all the way across to the gate for the little yard – ALL THE WAY into the chute – head secured in the headgate – without a bit of hassle.


I miss my Brucey.




The next time Cora had to be treated was for having a screw removed from her leg.  She’d yanked the cattle rub off the wall and tripped over the mount.  Thank God – the screw made a clean pass above her hoof.  Thank God for giving me the inclination to look all our cattle over when I feed.  And for cellphones that can take pictures.  But Kate had to scrounge up a Dart gun.  And it took 2 darts to knock Cora’s lights out so she could be treated.  We took advantage of the moment and gave her the annuals then.

Dwayne and I had fun touching her face and loving on her after Kate put her on her feet again – while Cora was still drunk.  J





But on this 3rd day after birthing Seamus - I had to wait for Dwayne to get home from work.  He had to use the tractor to move the Chute on its trailer.  We had to take it through April’s paddock – then through Storm and Dodger’s paddock – then get it into Artist’s paddock.  The tractor and the trailer were too wide for the gate with the latch installed.  Dwayne had to remove the latch.  We used a chain and clasp for the time being.  He had to unhitch the chute from its trailer.  He had to drag the chute into the little yard with the tractor.  And then we had to hand-pull the trailer into the little yard – hook it back up to the chute – hook that back up to the tractor – and manipulate it until we had it butted up to the door of the barn.  None of it comes easy.




Cora’s udder was in trouble.  And we had to get her into the chute before calling for any kind of help.

We had to use Seamus for bait – tying him outside the chute.  And one more surprise came when Dwayne managed to get a nylon combination halter/ lead rope on Cora.  We were shocked that he managed without her getting as ugly as April or Patty.  But she wouldn’t budge one step forward for him.

I showed her the sweetfeed – before handing it to Dwayne.  He held the bucket while I took the lead rope and prodded.  We all made our way through the chute until we got Cora secured in the headgate.  I let her touch her baby first.  And then – I always – follow through when I con with the sweetfeed.

I don’t like to my husband.  I don’t lie to my kids.  I don’t lie to my cows.

Thank God for ADCA members - and a Vet that was willing and able to show up on this particular Saturday.  We called Kathy Chaney.  She hooked us up with Jennifer McPheeters – who got dressed and drove all the way over to our place to help.




I will never forget a particular moment.  Jennifer was well into the milking when she was informed that she was milking a brood cow - that had only recently allowed us to touch her – and had never been milked before in her life.

But it got even better.  Jennifer informed us – she had never milked a cow in her life before!  Only goats.  And none of us could believe the pail of milk was standing there so still – filling up so fast.

And Seamus.  He was only a 3-day-old bull calf – enduring some very unexpected and expedited halter training.  He was so tiny that we used the nylon combination halter/lead rope for lambs.  And that little boy was just a pure natural at it.  He was so good!  He did such a wonderful job at it!  He stood right there by Mama – where they could see and touch each other.  And he’d just lay down when he got tired of standing.

Cora spent over 3 hours in that chute.  That made it a bit harder to get her back into the chute on Saturday.  I had to help with getting the combo halter on her.  And then Kate had to help us when she got there - getting Cora’s backside in and locked in so we could get her into the headgate.  Dwayne thought it through and we put a Control halter on her while we had her in the chute.

Me and Cora had a little party after we got that halter on her.  ;)  It was funny!  Her eyes started shining!  She knew what was going on.  She had her own bling – just like all the others!  She’d never had a real halter on in her life before that day.

And then Dr. Kate got busy.  It was a list that included - examining her – taking teat cultures – milking her out –injecting her 2 right side teats with antibiotic - and needle punching her all over the place – under her tail – both sides of her neck.  Once again – we took advantage of the situation – dealing with those annuals.  This was worse than that 3+ hours she’d spent in the chute during the night before – even though she wasn’t in there near as long.  But I did all I could to keep her attention redirected.

I taught Seamus a game. Love Mama, Seamus.”  He’d stick his head through the headgate and rub up and down her brisket!  They learn so fast at such an early age!  “Awww – Seamus loves his Mama!”  And Cora would start licking his neck and back.

I took advantage of having her in the chute – proving reasons to trust being touched.  She finally experienced being brushed.  She went through the touching on her face and figuring out what I was doing with the others when I do that while saying – “gentle.”  She’s come to enjoy that!  I’d rub her ears.  She’d almost go to sleep.

We went through several days afterward - getting Cora into the chute so we could milk out her right side quarters and inject the SpectraMast.  Each day became more of a challenge to get her into the chute.  Having that Control Halter on her has been a huge help.  But she just won’t budge for anyone but me.  And even then – it’s a fight.

We moved the chute away from the barn door and to an area that’s shaded in the evenings after Dwayne comes home from work.  We had several more days when we had to haul her into the chute and milk her out – even after finishing up the box of SpectraMast.

There’s a possibility that she may have let her milk down on that day when we tried putting her into the paddock with April and Aon.  It was a week or so before Seamus was born.  That may have contributed to the Mastitis developing.  It was shortly after that – when her udder began to just blow up.



(Took Cora 5 minutes to square April up about who was Boss!)

Time finally came when we could put Cora and Seamus into the paddock with April and Aon.  We had to bring them back into the little yard to milk her a couple times.  But we changed rations to get everybody grazing more.  And we began seeing Cora’s udder looking normal as it should be.  Dwayne discovered later – we were getting some help!

Dwayne busted Aon and Seamus – both – nursing on Cora.




Aon is a smart fart.  He lets Seamus get situated with his butt to his mama.  And then Aon gets situated on the left side of Seamus.  Seamus hits the right quarters.  Aon hits the left side!  He has no trouble finding things!

Seamus won’t mess with the teats on the right side because they’re too big for him.  And he always got so confused on the left side of Cora.  He kept bumping her under her chest – trying to get her to let her milk down.  Wrong end!

Kate will be coming out to inject Cora’s udder quarters with a prescribed med for drying up when we begin weaning.  We’re taking this protocol to assist with ensuring a better chance of having no issues in the future.

It’s come along so well that I can walk out to the paddock with a brush and Cora will stand there – enjoying every bit of it!  She even walks toward me when she sees the brush.

It’s amazing to me – the fact that it only took a year.  I’m sure the circumstances had a lot to do with helping.  But it’s such a wonderful feeling to be able to love on that cow!!

Don’t laugh at me.  Having a steer for a pet is a whole lot damn cheaper than a dog!!




Obviously – she’s wanted to fit in and be pampered like all the others.  She just needed time – patience – a little nurturing – and a lot of compromising.

Nobody can recognize that need for fitting in with the others more than me.


Never let anyone tell you that cows are stupid.  If you take the time to pay attention closely enough – they’ll tell you all kinds of secrets!

July 27, 2014

Cora's Transformation

(Taken as soon as I noticed Cora in labor and before the storm hit.)


It was a vision in my mind of the difference living here could make for Cora – that made sense out of deciding to cull Patty from our Herd.  It’s hard to describe.  But there was a moment I will never forget - on April 27, 2013.

I had Cora’s calf in our Gorilla cart – beckoning her to follow me into the barn so I could get both of them into a stall and out of the storm.  That baby needed to be put under the heat lamp and dried off – fast.

Cora followed me.  She got about 20 feet from the barn door – before Patty came charging up.  She T-boned Cora and started raising cane at Cora – demanding she come back.  Patty forced Cora all the way back to the furthest corner of the paddock.

It was an ‘eye-to-eye’ contact of communication between the 2 of us that told me so much.  In Cora’s eyes I could see her telling me that she wanted to come with me.  But she had no choice other than to go with Patty – no matter what she wanted.  Patty was one to get revenge when the Humans weren’t around.

And I knew that.  I’d seen it.  Patty never could see me watching her from between the blades of the window blinds in my sewing room.

But it was that moment of ‘eye-to-eye’ contact with Cora that put a solid hunch into my heart.  I just knew Cora would be so much happier – if Patty were gone.  And a day would come when I could brush her.

We just don’t sell mean animals.  Patty became much nicer – in the Freezer.  And you could just – feel – this warm and fuzzy blanket of – pure calmness – covering our entire property – as soon as that livestock trailer could no longer be seen or heard by the others.



It’s been a long – slow – patient – compromising journey with helping Cora build trust enough to fit in just like all the others – over this past year.  But we’ve pampered her.  We’ve never pushed.  She’s enjoyed the cookies – the extra hay – having so many things her way.  She’s appreciated being allowed to come inside the barn during the rough cold winter periods and during storms.  She’s appreciated the respect we’ve given her.

Through it all – she’s maintained 2 rules - “Do NOT touch me.” – “I don’t share my food with anybody!”

We’ve had to dance around the issue regarding her food rations.  Our first go-round of having April and Anna in the same paddock with her presented problems during meals.  She wasn’t backing down.  So we tried bringing the other 2 girls into the little yard to share the bunker during meals.  When it works – you go with it.  When it doesn’t work – you better be willing to think fast and try something else – if you want your own supper.

Cora has enjoyed – and appreciated - her life here since Patty left.  And she let that be known when April dropped her first calf.  She witnessed April take such a drastic switch into a negative direction with her behavior – as soon as that calf hit the ground.



Cora was in her own stall – beside April’s – when she watched April throw Dwayne into the air and against the wall.  All he was doing was picking up manure so she could enjoy a clean stall.  Cora’s always understood and appreciated that care from us.  She’s never resisted scooting over so we could “get the poo-poo” for her – not even when she spent a week in her stall after having Stormy.

She witnessed April’s constant attempts to ram us when we tried dishing her grain into her feed trough – even when we’d try giving that girl extra hay.  But I think the turning point came when Cora saw April ram me out in the paddock - and hurt my right arm – which I’d had surgery on in January.

Training Cora to come inside her stall to eat paid off in more ways than we’d even hoped.  We needed to be able to con her into that stall – especially when it came time for her to calve.  Having this calf was a whole new ballgame for her.  Patty wasn’t around.  And we wanted her to enjoy the experience – for a change.  But we never assumed things would go as hoped.

The surprise came when we noticed her eagerness and willingness from the start.  This was just one more thing that Cora wanted – in order to feel like she fit in with the others.  She wanted to eat inside her own stall – like April.  With the exception of the few days she spent in that stall after she calved Stormy – Cora had always shared the alley of the barn with Bruce – or – alone.

We turned April and Aon out into the paddock – after they’d had time to bond and he was fit for going outside.  We tried turning Cora out with them.  Right off the bat – Cora began trying to nurse Aon.  And she began shoving April out of the way.

We had to pull Cora out of there – immediately.  She was close to calving.  We could not have another calf robbing the Colostrum from Cora that would be needed for her own calf.

We’re not quite sure if this may have attributed to a problem we had later.

But the trouble we had with getting her out of there had me concerned.  Cora’s persistence – reluctance – followed by blowing snot at me for the rest of the day – had me feeling there was something more to it.  I had to kiss her butt with cookies and extra hay – even after the sweetfeed – just to get her to stop blowing the snot.

We know now – and we will try next time – milking the colostrum from Cora for storage – before pulling April’s calf and putting it with Cora.  But things with Cora began changing after that.

My routine with her during meals was to – deliberately – set her feed bowl in the furthest corner of her stall.  I was letting her know that I was respecting her flight zone in a small space.  I picked up manure around her – first.  And then I would lay her hay out along the front wall of her stall.

All of this – at the time – was about conditioning her - preparation for being able to access her stall with her and the calf inside.

I always made a point of swinging out - away from her big preggers butt to leave the stall after setting down her feed bowl.  The 2 of us developed a comfortable routine within a couple days.  Cora would follow me in and even give me room to set the bowl down before approaching to put her nose inside.  Basically – I’d walk the back wall of the stall – then walk the side wall and exit through the door.

There was a day – before we’d tried letting her out into the paddock with April and Aon – when she pulled a stunt on me.  I set the bowl down.  She approached the bowl and began eating as soon as I stepped to the right.  But as I reached the corner of the stall connecting the back and side walls – Cora made an obvious and deliberate move – dragging her feed bowl backward and swinging that big preggers butt to the right – trapping me into the corner.  She did it so fast that I lost my footing and had no choice but to lean on her right backside to catch myself.

Not one single flinch appeared in her entire body.  She just continued inhaling that grain – like nothing happened.  I had to remember to breathe first – move my hand second.

Until then - I’d always used my buzz words “coming around, Baby Girl” – whenever I needed to pass by her in the alley of the barn for any reason.  But I never touched her.  When I tried doing the same for this moment – the Girl would not budge.

I tried it again.  Only this time I gave her 2 soft pats on her right backside as I said the words.  That was one of those cliff-jumping moments.  My gut was wrecked!  She could have kicked the fool out of me – smashed me into the walls.  I could have been a goner – so easily – after touching her again!

She made one step to the left.  That was all.  I had to squeeze around her backside to get out of the corner.  (Compromising to the bitter end?)  She never even moved a hoof until I made it outside and closed the stall door.

I just stood there – holding back tears.  Everything inside me told me that she’d done that on purpose.

From that day until Seamus was born – Dwayne and I would test the waters with patting her on the butt every now and then.  She never fussed.


(Taken after we knew it was okay to go inside.)

As luck would have it – I couldn’t bring myself to lock her up in her stall near the end.  Me and my cup of coffee headed out to the barn as soon as I could see outlines of trees and structures on June 6, 2014.  I found Cora standing about 20 feet from her new black baby that was curled up in a ball and sleeping.  But that was even better than had she been inside the barn.

We’d been prepping Artist for the new arrivals.  He became pissed off after seeing April and Aon in the other paddock for the first time.  I had been telling him that he was gonna get to see HIS new baby.  I had prepped him with my buzz words.  “You and April are gonna have a new baby!  You’re gonna be a Daddy, Artist! I’m gonna make sure you get to see your baby.  I promise!”  They all know that last part secures the deal.  Mom follows through with that one – all but this one time anyway.  And it broke my heart.  I was as angry as him.



But Artist was able to stand only a few feet from Cora while she gave birth to Seamus!  He had to go through some training with learning how to use his “ Baby voice, Artist… Gentle.”  He goes from holding his head up kicking out a roar to holding his head way down and looking up with his eyes while he gives off this gentle coo.  I snicker every time he does it.  He loves to coo to the babies.  And it’s all just so cute!

But after all the frightening nightmare we went through with April – we both stood outside the little yard.  Dwayne stood next to the gate.  I stood under the RV pad.  Cora seemed to conclude that we were not coming inside.  And the coolest thing happened!

She walked over to the calf – began nudging and mooing until the calf stood.  And then – she began pushing the calf toward me!  Dwayne and I just looked at each other with mouths wide open.  We went inside!

It was as if she was compensating for April’s bad behavior – deciding to share her calf with us.  And Miss April watched the whole thing.  We could only hope she would learn a lot from Cora – and cool her jets.



We took pictures – of course!  And then we decided on a plan for getting the 2 of them into her stall – at least long enough to figure out how we’d get to the calf so we could dip the navel and give him his intranasal e.Coli bovine vaccine.

We tried the usual feeding routine.  It worked.  But she left the calf outside!  So Dwayne carried him in while I manned the stall door to get him in with her quickly – to quiet her down.  All she did was moo a little louder to let Seamus know she was there.

So much more different than April.  THAT Girl has had to learn so much with this first calf.  And the first lesson was learning that mommies do not leave their new babies in a corner of the bedroom and go partying!  All it took was a flake of hay.  She almost ran out of the barn to get to it.  It was as if she’d completely forgot that she’d just had a calf!

And then it took her a few minutes to realize we’d shut the barn door!  But when she snapped – all Hell broke loose!  Luckily – we had Rob and Michelle there.  We had to work fast to dip Aon’s navel – weigh him and give him the intranasal vaccine.  But Dwayne cleaned the stall.  He laid fresh hay over the entire stall and have her a couple flakes to eat.  All was fresh and clean – and baby was just fine.  Took her 5 whole minutes to shut up!

Cora had no problem after Dwayne set the calf down.  She let him come back into the stall to dip his navel and give him his vaccine.  She let both of us come inside and pet him – love on him.  She just made it so obvious that she wanted to share this calf with us!


That surprise became a blessing more than we could have imagined – 3 days later.  And I’ll share all that in the next posting!

July 26, 2014


It’s been forever since my last post.  And so much has happened.  Amazing to see how a year can fill up with so many events in one’s life.  But I’ll do my best to catch up with short versions, as much as possible.

Had Carpal Tunnel Release surgery on my left hand – July 16, 2013.  And then I went back in for the same surgery on the right hand – January 17, 2014.  But they also had to go back into the left hand – to do a Trigger Thumb Release on my thumb.

Had a bout of inflammation in my spine.  That sent me to the E.R. after a week of not being able to stand up or sit down for more than a few minutes at a time.  When I couldn’t even lay down to sleep – it was time to go.  They pumped me up with so much crap.  I don’t even remember going for any x-ray.

I'm currently scheduled to see a Spinal Neurosurgeon in a couple weeks.  An MRI showed issues with L1 through L5 in my spine.  They’re pretty concerned about L4 and L5.  Something about bulges – a spur – and the canal beginning to close?  I have no idea.  I only know I’m in Hell.  And it looks like another surgery could be in front of me.

As if that weren’t enough...

A visit with my doctor – almost 2 weeks ago - sent me home with a diagnosis of having awakened that morning with Sprained Ligaments in my left foot.  I’m telling everybody that Dwayne did it.  ;)  Actually – she says it could be a delayed injury that is known to happen hours before with some people.  I’ve been in a splint for the past 2 weeks.  I’m praying she’ll let me move into the boot when I see her this week.  I’ve been warned this will be one more lengthy trip to recovery.  Story of my life.  Smh…

With all this going on – Hubs is carrying the full load.  We had 23 hens and a Roo – until I came home with the splint on my leg.  Luckily – one of Hubs’ coworkers bought all the birds from us.  We were able to send him home with additional equipment and feed, as well.


We’ve had a new girl added to our Irish Dexter family!


Meet N40’s Anna Maria - ADCA #033480
Anna came to us last December.  She is the most lovable – sweetest – funniest – girl I have ever seen in a Heifer! Unless she’s in heat.  Otherwise - she follows us around like a puppy!

Miss Anna caused problems for a guy leasing land across from us!  We did all we could to hang in there for that 16th month.  And we ended up caving in a little early – after finding out our neighbor was having to fix a lot of fence.  I’ll never forget Hubs shifting his eyes at me and spitting out the words – “Put her in there with him - NOW!

She was totally silent for the next month.



Which reminds me – Artist finally had his first year of breeding.  He wasted no time at all with April and Cora – last August.


Meet "Aon" - Very first Calf for both - April and Artist!
He was born May 15, 2014 - weighed 45lbs. – red and horned. Sadly – Aon has extracted temperament traits from April and Cora’s Dam.  We are just - absolutely - sick about it.  He had so much promise with such a thick structure.  He was banded on the same day Hubs and Jeff de-horned and immunized.



We're going a second round with Miss April and trying something different.  She'll be allowed to keep her calf for 3 days - long enough to gain a good amount of colostrum.  We'll pull the calf after that.  If we don't get lucky enough with getting Cora or Anna to adopt the calf - I'll be bottle feeding.

April took a very serious turn in temperament after dropping her first calf - behaving even worse than her Dam. She's injured both of us.  She's calmed down some.  We made a point of giving her every opportunity to watch all the interaction that went on between the two of us with Cora and her calf.  Cora was very helpful with that.  And she seems to have helped keep April in check since rejoining with her back in the paddock.

Attempting to leave her calf with her next time has been written off.  Despite all the time that's gone by for adjustment and help from Cora - April triggers without warning around Aon.  We've seen an even more dangerous imprint in this calf.  He almost took out my kneecap.  It's enough that we can tell - that's as good as it's gonna get.  And that's unacceptable.

I am hoping and praying we are successful by pulling calves from April.  Anyone that has kept in touch knows - She is my Baby Girl.

If we don't see a difference in temperament - we will be faced with culling April from our herd.  She'll head off to the other realm of life with her Dam.  The freezer.  I've laid my foot down - and Dwayne agrees.  We just don't sell mean animals.  It would be as heartbreaking for me as Bruce still is.  But I've always been used to having to shove my personal feelings to the bottom of any list in my life.



Miss Cora had another black bull calf again – this year. And let me say this.  Her story this year has been nothing short of a miracle for the 2 of us that are green as goose poop!

From the moment it was decided that Patty needed to be culled – I’ve had a picture in my head about the difference it would make in Cora’s life here.  Not only did that picture become a reality.  But Miss Cora decided to pay us back in kind – 100 fold.  And that story will be in my next posting!



Meet “STC Ealaiontoir’s Seamus” – ADCA #pending!
He was born June 6, 2014 - weighed 55lbs.. (Cora seems to produce bigger calves.)

His tests just came back a couple days ago – all but the Parentage Genotyping.  We’re expecting to receive that by this coming Tuesday – according to Stephanie.

He's been de-horned.  Seamus is black – carries red and dun - Chondro and PHA Negative - milk genotype is A1/A2.

So – we struck out with the A2/A2 and any hope of Chondro. (Cora’s Sire is Chondro.)  Can’t win everything that flows with the latest fads.  But then – I’ve never been one to roll with fads!  ;)  Besides – this young man makes up the difference in soooo many other ways!!

Ohhhh – I just LOVE this boy!  He’s so adorable!  And such a lover!

Once we get all his test results back – Seamus will be registered with Legacy and ADCA.  After all the registrations are complete – we will decide on a price and he will be available to purchase after weaning in September!

We do know one thing for sure right at the moment!  Once we’ve found a new home for Seamus -

We’re wanting to find a black – horned – PHA negative – Chondro POSITIVE Heifer to add to our Herd.

She should be completely halter/lead broken – AND fully trained.  A2/A2 is not mandatory for us.

In the meantime - Anna is expecting her first calf around January 31, 2015.  April and Cora have already been bred back.  April should be due to calve around April 14, 2015.  Cora should be due to calve around April 25, 2015.



Our garden was doing great – until I injured my ankle. Dwayne keeps the harvesting up as much as he can.  But it’s impossible for him to do everything.  We were already looking for a pocket of safe time for harvesting another cutting of hay.  And that takes priority over the veggies. If nothing else – we can hit the farmer’s markets in Knoxville.  We were planning on hitting a bunch of those this year anyway.

We planted Lapins and Bing varieties of Cherry trees this year.  This past winter took out several of our plantings. I lost my potted red Crepe Myrtle that I adored.  We thought we lost our Pink EscalloniaBlack Knight Butterfly Bush – and my precious Celeste Fig tree.  But all three died back to the ground and came back!  I’ll be mulching a LOT more this fall season.

All our fantastic job with the landscape under our front porch staircase was destroyed by the chickens.  Now that they’re gone – we can repair all that damage!

Our Thornless Blackberry bush refuses to die.  And of course – when I give up on the thing – it decides to give me a harvest better than ever.  Go figure.



Our Kay Gray grapes are turning out a harvest 5 times more than we had last year!  We are so excited about the grape jelly we’re gonna get this year!

Dwayne put his foot down and demanded we plant melon seeds in the ‘hole’ out between all the paddocks.  Yeaaah.  That won’t be happening again.

I planted my very first Lilac bush this year!  It’s very happy with it’s spot in the Veggie garden.

The next big project – more shelter construction – and getting the new pasture area fenced after the next cutting of hay.

Enough for now.  More later!

September 8, 2013

Online Pedigree Picture Day


It was Picture Day today.  I've sent the photos in.  But this is Sunday.  I expect it will be a couple days before the new photos are posted.  But you can still get to their Pedigree by clicking on their name where I've underlined!

New guidelines have been set up for Online Pedigree photos with the ADCA.  So we did our most Amateur-Plagued Best!

‘Cuz Amateur is all we got!  And we’ll count it as a blessing and take it!




Artist is now 19 months old.  I have trouble with that.  I see him now and he’s changed so much since he was a baby.  It seems like he’s been here forever.  So my own mind wants to assume he’s an old man.

Don’t even bother.  Trust me.  I have no idea.  But then – the more I think about it…

Maybe it has something to do with spending every day going gaga over him every time I see him.  I’m just so proud of Artist!  He won’t even be full-grown until he turns 3 years old.  And I just know he’s gonna be so gorgeous that I can’t stand it!




He melts for me and Dwayne.  He’s like… the best child we’ve ever had.  He knows who butters his bread!  And he makes sure we know he appreciates that!

Seriously.  He is the most well-behaved Bull we will probably ever have.  There is such a strong level of respect and understanding between Artist and the two of us.

I was downright stunned yesterday.  We’ve had to settle for having April come into the barn alley to eat.  It just keeps the peace for everyone.  Cora just can’t find a happy medium with her issues.  Artist has no problem with what’s working.

In fact – April wouldn’t come to me for yesterday evening’s feeding.  She was feeling intimidated by Cora standing in the pathway.  Artist – literally – goosed April in the butt and shoved her toward me!

I fell out!  He headed over to his feed bunker as soon as April made her way to me.

Two things I always do out of pure habit during feedings.  I give our animals a good looking over.  And I check their halters.




Yesterday was a big day for April.  She got moved into a Medium-size Dexter Halter.  We made out like it was ‘ Girl Bling ‘ and April just went gaga over all the excitement!  She kept wanting to lick the halter while I was trying to get it on and adjusted.

And Artist noticed her new pretty as soon as she walked out into the paddock.  He liked it!  He walked right up to her new halter and began rubbing on it – giving her kisses.  It was soooo cute!

Actually - it was just weird.  I don’t expect seeing things like that going on with cows.  For now – I keep tucking these little scenarios in my mental file cabinet.  Just in case.  I mean – there’s awesomely well-behaved.  And then there’s just – weird.  I just feel like I really need to keep my eyes on Mister Artist.  Just sayin’.



She's talking to Dwayne.  They gossip all the time.

For whatever reason – Cora has no problem with any of it.  She just keeps her head to the grind – wherever the tall grass grows!

Until you bring the hay out – anyway.  And then she works really hard trying to convince you that she wants to be your BFF – long enough to ‘ help you ‘ with that hay you’re carrying.

Once she gets her way with the hay – she’s forgotten you ever existed.

But we all know what happens with those girls.  Right?!


That’s okay.  I got a cellphone – a Vet – and we can get our hands on a Dart Gun – anytime we need to do some serious dealings with Miss Cora.

;p